10 Unusual Natural Wonders that Could Belong in a Movie

by Shweta Anand12 months ago

6 Siwa Oasis, Egypt 

Siwa Oasis in Egypt is an archetypal oasis set against the backdrop of the Great Sand Sea and beautiful sandstone hills. It is especially noted for its hot springs, lakes, and pools that are often extremely high in salt concentrations. As a result, it is impossible to drown in them, even without knowing how to swim. 

Siwa Oasis
Image credits: u/Frequent_Bet9463/Reddit

Like most desert oases, Siwa Oasis in Egypt also teems with life. Its fresh springs give life to olive trees and date palms, and its isolated location supports a unique society that differs from much of Egypt. 

Siwa Oasis
Image credits: u/ohnoh18/Reddit

But apart from this, this unusual natural wonder is also home to numerous salt lakes and pools. The smaller pools are often formed in areas that were previously used for salt mining and contain high amounts of salt. 

It is in these pools that tourists often find themselves floating leisurely, despite not knowing how to swim. Since these pools are high in salt concentration, the water becomes denser than our bodies and makes it impossible to drown. 

Certain other spring water pools, like Cleopatra’s Bath, are also used as bathing spots by the locals. Visitors to the area can also use these pools to rejuvenate themselves after their long journeys to reach the oasis. (1, 2, 3)

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7 Crowley Lake Stone Columns, California

Located in California, the Crowley Lake Stone Columns are some pillar-like formations found along the eastern side of the lake. Through millions of years of erosion, the stone structures have turned into pipe-like formations that look like a forest of oddly-shaped pillars. 

The Crowley Lake Columns
The Crowley Lake Columns

The strange pillar-like formations known as the Crowley Lake Stone Columns emerged in 1941 after the Crowley Lake Reservoir was completed. These often go up to 20 feet in height and are connected by high arches.

The Crowley Lake Columns
The Crowley Lake Columns

Hundreds of thousands of years ago, when the Long Valley Caldera was formed by volcanic action, hot lava is believed to have flowed into the area. Then, the lava is likely to have baked the ash in the area into layers of stone in an instant. 

Now, after millions of years of erosion, the bottom and top layers of the stone can be seen taking the form of rocky waves separated by a dividing line. But along certain sections, the stone has turned into what looks like “degassing pipes,” as seen on the eastern shore of the lake.

According to experts, there are as many as 5,000 columns within two to three miles of the lakes, with diverse shapes and sizes. (1, 2)

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8 Giant’s Causeway, Northern Ireland 

In Northern Ireland, Giant’s Causeway is a natural formation of hexagonal-shaped columns. These were likely formed as a result of volcanic activity when molten lava cooled and contracted at the site. Scientists believe that these structures were formed at a temperature between 1,544 °F and 1,634 °F. 

Giant's Causeway
Giant’s Causeway

Northern Ireland’s Giant’s Causeway consists of about 40,000 near-perfect hexagonal columns that look like an architectural marvel. However, these are completely natural formations that are millions of years old. 

Giant's Causeway
Giant’s Causeway

Legend has it that it was built as a crossing by an Irish giant named Finn MacCool to confront his Scottish rival. However, scientists have an alternate theory. 

According to them, these structures were formed some 50 to 60 million years ago when a flood of lava oozed from fissures in the ground. Although such geometric shapes are common in nature when volcanic activity is involved, scientists were initially unsure of the temperature at which these columns were formed. Later, however, they were able to estimate that the Giant’s Causeway was created at temperatures between 1,544 °F and 1,634 °F. 

Similar sites have been discovered in the US, Iceland, and even on Mars, although they differ in shapes and sizes. Nevertheless, Giant’s Causeway continues to remain a unique site that attracts many visitors. (1, 2)

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9 Lake Abraham, Canada

Alberta in Canada is home to Lake Abraham, which stretches 33 kilometers (21 miles) between the Kootenay Plains and Nordegg. During the colder seasons, this lake transforms into a unique natural wonder with trapped and frozen methane bubbles visible underneath its surface. 

Abraham lake winter ice formation bubbles
Abraham lake winter ice formation bubbles.

Lake Abraham in Alberta, Canada is located in the foothills of the Canadian Rockies and stretches 33 kilometers (21 miles) between Kootenay Plains and Nordegg. The only form of direct winter access to the lake is through the David Thompson Highway, which was named after the explorer who mapped out most of Western Canada. 

Abraham lake winter ice formation bubbles
Abraham lake winter ice formation bubbles.

During winters, the lake turns into a marvelous sight as it traps frozen methane bubbles just under its surface. At this time of the year, the lake also experiences wind speeds that reach 48 kph (30 mph). These frigid blasts of air then ensure that its surface remains crystal clear, allowing visitors to easily spot the frozen bubbles. 

The year-round methane levels in the lake are produced by bottom-dwelling bacteria that feast on organic matter. In the winter, the gas floats to the surface and gets frozen by the extremely low temperatures near the surface. (1, 2)

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10 Devil’s Bath, New Zealand 

New Zealand’s Wai-O-Tapu area is home to numerous volcanic wonders. Of these, the Devil’s Bath is a popular pool that is colored an unusually bright green. This is caused by the sulfur deposits in the area that float to the surface of the water and lend it its color. 

Devil's Bath crater
Devil’s Bath crater

The Devil’s Bath in Wai-O-Tapu, New Zealand is a pool that appears electric green in color. Since Wai-O-Tapu is rife with volcanic activity, it is not short on wondrous steaming and bubbling sights. But among them all, this stagnant pool of “stink water” is often the most eye-catching due to its unique appearance. 

Devil's Bath crater
Devil’s Bath crater

The pool sits in a slight depression, likely created by a massive volcanic eruption, and is well out of reach from visitors. However, it can still be seen clearly from above. The water body gets its signature color from the sulfur that rises to its surface and floats. Meanwhile, hues like red or blue that may also be spotted in it are caused by other volcanic elements. 

Despite its unusual appearance, it is unclear how this body of water came to receive its demonic moniker. Nevertheless, its unusual name and appearance continue to attract visitors to the area even today. (1, 2)

Also Read:
10 of the Most Unusual and Weird Buildings in the World

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